Tag Archives: Sue Doe

News of Note Week of October 27th

Ingersoll Hall in Fall, image by Jill Salahub

Blue sky over Ingersoll Hall in Fall, image by Jill Salahub

  • Gerry Delahunty presented his paper on “Lexical semantics: How much English teachers need to know?” at the 7th International Conference on English Language Teaching (ELT) in China, in Nanjing, China.
  • Lisa Langstraat and Sue Doe are delighted to announce that their book-length collection, Generation Vet: Student-Veterans, Composition, and the Post-9/11 University, has been released by Utah State Press and the University Press of Colorado.  Sue and Lisa celebrated by giving a presentation at CSU’s first-ever national veteran symposium on Thursday, October 30. Their presentation focused on “Pathologization and Sanitization: Two Problematic Extremes of University Relationships with Military and Veteran Populations” which is based on their ongoing longitudinal study of over two dozen student-veterans and their transitional literacies.
  • Jonathan Starke (MFA Fiction/Nonfiction 2011) has essays in the current issues of North American Review and River Teeth and an essay in the annual Baltimore Review print issue. He also has a short story in the summer issue of Shenandoah. He’s spending the winter vagabonding through France, Croatia, Germany, and anywhere one can find authentic handmade soaps and local beers.
  • Upcoming 4×4 Reading, November 4th – Reading will be Hannah Kezema from Naropa University, Aditi Machado from Denver University, Caroline Rothnie from CU–Boulder, and CSU’s own Melissa Hohl. University Center for the Arts , 7:30pm.
  • Greyrock Review is now accepting submissions! Greyrock Review is an undergraduate anthology at Colorado State University. Submissions are open from October 6, 2014 to December 1, 2014 for original work in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and visual arts. Any undergraduate at CSU may submit their work at https://greyrockreview.submittable.com/submit for free and will be notified by December 15, 2014. Any questions may be sent to editor.csu@gmail.com
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News of Note: Week of September 15th

Flashback: Eddy courtyard, Fall 2013 (image by Jill Salahub)

Flashback: Eddy courtyard, Fall 2013 (image by Jill Salahub)

  • Leslee Becker’s story, “The Twilight Club,” has been accepted for publication in Alaska Quarterly Review. Another story, “If You Lived Here,” received an Honorable Mention in The New Millennium Fiction Contest.
  • John Calderazzo will give several science and literature talks at the south rim of the Grand Canyon, at the only public school in a U.S. national park. He will be in residence there for two weeks.
  • Sue Doe’s co-authored article with Psychology faculty member Karla Gingerich, Washington University (St. Louis) faculty member Julie Bugg, and several others, was recently published in Teaching of Psychology. It is titled “Active Processing via Write-to-Learn Assignments: Learning and Retention Benefits in Introductory Psychology.”
  • Leif Sorensen will present at the Latina(o)/Latin American Studies Scholars Colloquium at CSU on Monday September 22. His paper is titled “Region and Ethnicity on the Air: Reconstructing Américo Paredes’s Radio Career.” The event is part of a series of brown bag talks by CSU scholars working on topics in Latina(o)/Latin American Studies and it will take place in the Morgan Library Event Hall from noon until 1:00 p.m. Coffee and tea will be provided and the event is free and open to all.
  • Debby Thompson’s personal essay “Scavenger Love” was listed as a “notable” in the 2014 Best American Essays.
  • Kristin George Bagdanov’s poem “Purge Body” was accepted for publication in Mid American Review.
  • Maura Smith’s personal essay “Omphalos,” which was part of her 2012 Creative Nonfiction thesis and published in the Bellevue Literary Review, has been named a “Notable” in the 2014 Best American Essays list.

Faculty Profile: Sue Doe

Associate Professor Sue Doe teaches courses in Composition, Autoethnographic Theory and Method, Research Methods, and Graduate Student Preparation for Writing in the Disciplines. She does research in three distinct areas—academic labor, writing across the curriculum, and student-veteran writing in the post-9/11 era. Coauthor of the faculty development book Concepts and Choices: Meeting the Challenges in Higher Education, she has published articles in College English, College Composition and Communication, and Writing Program Administration as well as several book-length collections.  Her forthcoming collection on student-veterans in the Composition classroom, Generation Vet:  Composition, Veterans, and the Post-911 University, co-authored with Professor Lisa Langstraat, is under contract with the Utah State Press.

suedoe


Faculty Profile: Sue Doe
~by Brianna Wilkins

How would you describe your work at CSU?

I work in the Rhetoric and Composition area of the English Department. I’m both the graduate advisor, and the undergraduate writing major director; we rotate positions, and right now I’m doing those two roles. Prior to that when I first came on in my current position in 2007, I was brought in to do gtPathways, which is a writing integration that’s gone on within the entire core curriculum.

What bought you to CSU?

I actually started teaching here several years ago in 1997. I moved here with my family and my husband had a position here with the university, and I started a PhD program at that point. While I was working on my PhD I began teaching a course or two here in the English department. A while after I got my PhD, the department did a national search for a new person in rhetoric and comp, I applied for it, and that’s how I came to be in my current position.

What did you want to be when you were a kid?

Right up through my freshman year of college I wanted to be something in the sciences; I loved science; I liked to write, and I imagined that I’d write about science. At that time science writing was just a vague idea; it wasn’t really a path that you could follow in graduate school. I think it was after my first course in chemistry when I thought that maybe I wouldn’t do anything with science (laughs). I was also a musician; I played the piano and I sang, so for a while I thought I was going to be a musician. Early on, both of those things I thought of more so than doing something with English.

What special projects are you working on right now?

My colleague Dr. Lisa Langstraat and I have been working on a longitudinal study of student veterans at CSU, and we’ve been looking at the influx of veterans from our recent wars into universities. There are now 1 million student veterans across the country. We now have an ever increasing number of student veterans on this campus, and we’re also considered a veteran friendly campus. One of the things she and I are doing is to examine the experience of the student veteran from the start of their time at CSU to the end of it, and to examine how their literacy practices change over the course of their transition period, as they move from being in the military to civilian life.

What is your most memorable moment in the classroom?

One of the moments which stands out the most is something I think about a lot. I’m a mother of three, and my first child was born a week before finals. I took him into the final exam, and I will never forget that moment of being in the classroom. My students were at the end of the semester and finishing up the course; at the same time I was starting on something new which was being a mom, and the generosity of those students was amazing. It could have been extremely awkward, but there was no way that I was going to leave behind my one week old baby. I didn’t know what to expect, and maybe it wasn’t the smartest thing to do, but I couldn’t imagine leaving him behind. It was the most wonderful final exam that anyone could imagine.

What do you do during your free time?

I love to run. I’ve been a runner for about 40 years; there’s nothing like putting on my running sneakers and just going. It’s the best sport in the world because it doesn’t involve any equipment except those shoes so you can do it almost anywhere. And getting out into the elements, regardless of the weather, is not only freeing but empowering. I also love to hang out with my family. I have a grandson who is almost two and lives here in Fort Collins, He is just too funny and reminds me of the wonders of life because he sees everything, from a particle of dust to a dandelion. with fresh eyes. In a few weeks he will have a new baby sister and one of my two other children is also expecting a child. By the end of June, I’ll be a grandmother to three little children and while I initially felt I was too young for this grandma gig, I’ve come to enjoy it, just as everyone said I would!

What is something that your colleagues may not know about you?

I once wrote a speech for Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf

News of Note from the Week of April 14th

Things are blooming at Eddy Hall

Things are blooming at Eddy Hall, image by Jill Salahub

  • There’s a review of various work Dan Beachy-Quick has written at Pleiades: http://www.ucmo.edu/pleiades/news/Tayson.html, and a short essay about the tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary, “The Fragile Bow: On Imagination and Atrocity” is published at Ghost Proposal: http://www.ghostproposal.com/issue4/danbeachyquick.php
  • Tatiana Nekrasova-Becker and Tony Becker will be presenting their topic, Evaluating a Project-Based Activity: Moving from Theory to Practice at the K-12 and University Level (Integrating STEM Content and Foreign Language Education), on April 19th at the 2014 Symposium on Languages for Specific Purposes in Boulder, CO.
  • Lisa Langstraat, Sue Doe, Emily Morgan, Nancy Henke, and Vani Kannan presented a roundtable at the Conference on College Composition and Communication, 4C’s, on March 21. The presentation focused on the CO150 course reader, The Ethics of Higher Education, and a research study conducted in the fall on the potential effects of curriculum and curricular intervention on student, faculty, and public attitudes toward academic labor issues. Maria Maisto, President and Executive Director of the New Faculty Majority, was respondent.
  • The latest issue of AWP Writer’s Chronicle includes a feature interview on Camille Dungy.
  • Last weekend, Roze Hentschell participated in a seminar at the annual meeting of the Shakespeare Association of America in St. Louis. She presented new work, “Paul’s Boys: Actors, Choristers, Students, and Children in St. Paul’s Cathedral Precinct,” which is part of her book-in-progress.
  • Airica Parker’s poetry will appear in CALYX Vol. 28, No. 2.

Upcoming Events of Interest

  • April 21, 2014: Literature MA Showcase at Cranknstein, 215B N. College Avenue. Monday, 4:00-7:00pm – Remarks and presentations start at 4:45 pm.
  • April 24, 2014: Reading Series – Robert Hass & Brenda Hillman (Poetry), Thursday, 7:30pm North Ballroom in the Lory Student Center.
  • April 27, 2014: Slamogadro Poetry Slam – Avogadro’s Number will be hosting a Poetry Slam on the final Sunday of every month, April 27th is the first one. 7:00pm signup 7:30 start – All are welcome.
  • May 1, 2014: Reading Series – Kaelyn Riley & Ben Findlay MFA Thesis Reading (Poetry & Fiction), Thursday, 7:30pm University Art Museum.