Tag Archives: Mary Crow

News of Note for the Week of September 8th

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Pulitzer Prize-winning Beat poet & eco-activist Gary Snyder will be reading at the Organ Recital Hall this Wednesday, Sept. 17th, at 7:30 p.m. NO TICKETS ARE REQUIRED. It is first come, first served, so people should arrive early.

In other news:

  • This summer, Jacket2 released a feature on the second-wave Objectivist poet John Taggart, edited by Matthew Cooperman. A collection of 17 essays, appreciations, reviews, poems and career appraisals, the 200 page feature included, among other things, a group poem, “Seeds Sown for John Taggart,” composed by Matthew and recent MFAs, including Joanna Doxey, Lincoln Greenhaw, Anamika Dugger, Kaelyn Riley, Hannah Holler Blair, Sarah Louise Pieplow, Rachel Linnea Brown and Mickey Kenney. The poem (and the feature) evolved out of a Graduate Poetry Workshop back in 2011, where they read Taggart’s new and selected poems, Is Music. More information can be found at: http://jacket2.org/feature/reasons-singing-john-taggart
  • EJ Levy gave a reading at Politics & Prose in DC last weekend; she will read at DePauw, give the Beck lecture at Denison, and read at the Kenyon Literary Festival next month as winner of the 2014 GLCA New Writers Award in Fiction. Her essay on marriage appeared in Salon this summer: http://www.salon.com/2014/07/29/im_a_lesbian_marrying_a_man/
  • Sasha Steensen and Dan Beachy-Quick have published essays in the Taos Journal of International Poetry and Art.  Sasha’s essay, “With Pleasure: Gertrude Stein and the Sentence Diagram” can be found at http://www.taosjournalofpoetry.com/with-pleasure-gertrude-stein-and-the-sentence-diagram/, and Dan’s essay,  “Of Time and Timelessness in the Poetic Sentence,” can be found at http://www.taosjournalofpoetry.com/of-time-and-timelessness-in-the-poetic-sentence/
  • Debby Thompson’s essay “The Four Stages of Cancer,” which was published in Upstreet, has been nominated by that journal for a Pushcart Prize.
  • Kristina Quynn taught a TILT seminar this week, “Reading Closely: Harnessing the Power of Literary Studies to Boost Student Learning.” In attendance were CSU faculty and graduate students from a range of departments, including Veterinary Science, Economics, Sociology, Computer Science, and many more.
  • Poems by Mary Crow have been accepted for publication in several literary magazines: “And Then” by Illuminations, “Blown Away” by Mojave River Review, “Full Circle” by Big Muddy, and “Double Agent” by Driftwood Press Literary Review.
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News of Note from the Week of April 21st

Things are greening up and the bike racks are full at Eddy Hall, image by Jill Salahub

Things are greening up and the bike racks are full at Eddy Hall, image by Jill Salahub

  • Barbara Sebek led a seminar on “Reimagining Topicality” at the Shakespeare Association conference in St. Louis earlier this month. A group of scholars wrote papers addressing the wide variety of ways that topical references operate in the work of Shakespeare, Jonson, and others. Her essay on how Shakespeare’s Falstaff participates in cultural debates over beer, ale, and increasingly popular Spanish wines will soon appear in Shakespeare Studies volume 42. The essay is called “More natural to the nation: Situating Shakespeare in the Querelle de Canary.”
  • Mary Crow has had several poems accepted for publication: “In My Beginning” by Common Ground Review, “Variations” and “Walking Thoughts” by Cimarron Review, “Due Diligence” by Tulane Review, “Into the Desert” by Packington Review, “Seals Bobbin in the Sea” by Pinyon Poetry. She has also been accepted for a week in August at the Ashbery Home School. “The Ashbery Home School of Hudson, New York is a one-week writing conference from August 10th to August 15th, 2014 which welcomes poets who seek to redefine their practice through a radical consideration of the other arts—music, cinema, the visual arts, dance as well as other media. Featuring daily workshops, guest seminars & readings by visiting poets and nightly film screenings, AHS is a concentrated, unique engagement between poetry and the arts in the historic setting of Hudson, New York,” (http://ashberyhomeschool.org/).
  • Department alumna Colleen Fullbright (1990s) has recently revised her 2005 book Cancer: How to Help a Friend Who Has Cancer and it will be published by the American Cancer Society.

Upcoming Events of Interest

  • April 27, 2014: Slamogadro Poetry Slam – Avogadro’s Number will be hosting a Poetry Slam on the final Sunday of every month, April 27th is the first one. 7:00 pm signup, 7:30 start – All are welcome.
  • May 1, 2014: Reading Series – Kaelyn Riley & Ben Findlay MFA Thesis Reading (Poetry & Fiction), Thursday, 7:30pm University Art Museum.
  • May 9. 2014: Final day of classes, Spring 2014
  • May 12th – 16th: Finals Week

Notes from the Chair

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Hello! My name is Louann Reid. I have been department chair since 2011 and a faculty member at CSU for 20 years. I am thrilled that we are launching this department-wide blog. In it we can showcase the people, programs, and publications that are the life and shape of our vibrant and diverse department.  We hope that alumni, faculty, and both current and potential students will find much of interest here.

Under the editorship of Jill Salahub, posts from our communications interns and others, and feedback from you, the readers, this blog will become a virtual community of readers, writers, and thinkers who are passionate about all that English studies offers. In my posts, I will highlight department news or comment on relevant topics circulating on the Internet or on social media. Sometimes, like today, I will share a favorite text. This is one of my favorite poems by CSU Professor Emeritus Mary Crow and comes from her collection, Borders.

Hard Things: Colorado

Home: Goat mountain, frozen hillside,
shale rubble on the slope
where I struggled to climb
against the slipping and slippery
scrim up to the small caves,
lairs of mountain lions, or old graves
full of fine dark dust.

I used to drive home, feeling the weight
lift off my shoulders mile after mile.
Friends asked how I could bear
living so far out, but I loved
driving toward the light, turning into the gate,
the dog and horses racing to greet me,
the sound of the river pounding against
my ego, my pitiless self.