Tag Archives: John Calderazzo

News of Note Week of November 3rd

Fall lingers at Ingersoll Hall, even as the snow blows in. Image by Jill Salahub

Fall lingers at Ingersoll Hall, even as the first winter snow blows in. Image by Jill Salahub

  • John Calderazzo will soon give a talk about science communication at the National Wildlife Research Center in Fort Collins.
  • Tobi Jacobi presented a workshop on historical documents from the 1920s New York State Training School for Girls at the Hudson Area Library in late October.
  • Tobi Jacobi presented a critical paper on the popular Netflix series Orange is the New Black and women’s prison writing at the Western States Rhetoric and Literacy conference in Reno, NV in early November.
  • Sasha Steensen and Martin Corless-Smith interviewed one another for The Conversant. You can read the discussion here: http://theconversant.org/?p=8495.
  • Karen Montgomery Moore’s proposal “Reading the Dead Bodies on Bones” was accepted for presentation at the College of Liberal Arts Graduate Student Symposium with the theme “Constructing Humanity” at the University of Nevada-Reno in February. She adds, “They extended their proposal deadline to the 15th! I’d love company!”
  • On Saturday, November 1st, eleven English department faculty members helped award $14,000 in scholarship money at the CSU Senior Scholarship Day. In conjunction with the Admissions Office, Dan Beachy-Quick, Tatiana Nekrasova-Beker, Ellen Brinks, Pam Coke, Ashley Davies, Katie Hoffman, Zach Hutchins, Tobi Jacobi, Ed Lessor, Sarah Sloane, and Leif Sorensen conducted writing workshops with and read timed essays from 91 Colorado high school seniors. We are thankful for their hard work!
  • On October 10-11th, undergraduate and graduate students from the CSU English department attended the Colorado Language Arts Society Regional Conference at the School of Mines in Golden, CO.  Past NCTE@CSU President and current student teacher Tyler Arko served on two separate panels.  Pam Coke moderated one of these panels, and she presented a second session with CSU alum Steven Ray Parker, who is now a full-time English teacher at Kinard Core Knowledge School in Fort Collins.  Student attendees included current NCTE@CSU President Anton Gerth, NCTE@CSU Vice-President Belle Kraxberger, and NCTE@CSU member Jenna FranklinLouann Reid and Antero Garcia attended as well; Antero will be a featured presenter at next year’s conference.
  • For English Department graduating undergraduates and MA graduate students: Thursday, November 13th, 3:30 – 5:00 p.m., Academic Village C141 (Engineering Hall). “Pursuing an MA or PhD in English: Everything You Wanted to Know.” This workshop will focus on the following: what advanced work in higher education entails; how to identify good graduate programs for your needs; what to expect from the application process and how to maximize your chances of success. After a presentation, faculty from various areas of English will be on hand to answer any questions you have and to speak personally about their own experiences.

News of Note Week of October 20th

Ingersoll Hall in Fall, image by Jill Salahub

Ingersoll Hall in Fall, image by Jill Salahub

  • SueEllen Campbell and John Calderazzo recently gave a talk at Northern Arizona University, “The Real Work: Facing Climate Change.” They were also interviewed on the local NPR station. John also spoke to an environmental communications class.
  • A portfolio of essays on “The Work of Poetry” has just been released by Free Verse, including, among various riches, work by Matthew Cooperman and Dan Beachy-Quick. The special feature marks the 25th edition of Free Verse, and can be found at http://english.chass.ncsu.edu/freeverse/Archives/2014/prose/WorkOfPoetry.html
  • The most recent issue of Shakespeare Studies, vol. 42, is now available. This issue includes Barbara Sebek’s contribution to a forum on “Diet and Identity in Shakespeare’s England,” edited by Kim Coles and Gitanjali Shahani Chopra.
  • Todd Mitchell ran two writing and craft sessions at ReadCon — a High Plains Library District Event in Greeley to celebrate texts and the creation of texts. Here’s an article from Thursday’s Greeley Tribune with more information on the event: http://www.greeleytribune.com/entertainment/13486821-113/readcon-greeley-downtown-event Lit Pick recently did an author interview with Todd Mitchell. If you’re curious to learn how love letters, DFW, and snakes have influenced Todd, you can find the interview here: http://www.litpick.com/author/todd-mitchell
  • Daniel Owen, INTO adjunct, has accepted an appointment as an English Language Fellow from the Department of State.  He will have a 10-month Fellowship in Yamousoukro, Cote d’Ivoire.  He will be teaching at National Polytechnic Institute Felix Houphouet Boigny (INPHB). INPHB is a prestigious public university with undergraduate and graduate degree programs in sciences, engineering, and business.  He will be teaching general English courses and business English at both the undergraduate and graduate level.
  • Sue Ring deRosset, (MA, Creative Nonfiction, Summer 2013), teaches creative writing workshops at Front Range Community College, recently taught a workshop through Northern Colorado Writers, and is a freelance editorial consultant for memoirists and novelists. Chapter 1 of her thesis, a memoir, appeared in the Spring 2013 Front Range Review as a stand-alone essay titled “The Chambered Nautilus.” Since graduation, she’s had poems published in the Rocky Mountain NP Poetic Inventory and online, and an essay published in the Fort Collins Courier. A book on vultures, the first in a series of limited-edition, hand-bound, letterpress books, is forthcoming from Wolverine Farm Publishing.
  • Greyrock Review Fundraiser Reading at Cranknstein Tuesday, October 28, 2014 at 7 pm to raise money for publication. Camille Dungy, Matthew Cooperman and others will read, and there will be many fabulous prizes!
  • Greyrock Review is now accepting submissions! Greyrock Review is an undergraduate anthology at Colorado State University. Submissions are open from October 6, 2014 to December 1, 2014 for original work in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and visual arts. Any undergraduate at CSU may submit their work at https://greyrockreview.submittable.com/submit for free and will be notified by December 15, 2014. Any questions may be sent to editor.csu@gmail.com

News of Note: Week of September 15th

Flashback: Eddy courtyard, Fall 2013 (image by Jill Salahub)

Flashback: Eddy courtyard, Fall 2013 (image by Jill Salahub)

  • Leslee Becker’s story, “The Twilight Club,” has been accepted for publication in Alaska Quarterly Review. Another story, “If You Lived Here,” received an Honorable Mention in The New Millennium Fiction Contest.
  • John Calderazzo will give several science and literature talks at the south rim of the Grand Canyon, at the only public school in a U.S. national park. He will be in residence there for two weeks.
  • Sue Doe’s co-authored article with Psychology faculty member Karla Gingerich, Washington University (St. Louis) faculty member Julie Bugg, and several others, was recently published in Teaching of Psychology. It is titled “Active Processing via Write-to-Learn Assignments: Learning and Retention Benefits in Introductory Psychology.”
  • Leif Sorensen will present at the Latina(o)/Latin American Studies Scholars Colloquium at CSU on Monday September 22. His paper is titled “Region and Ethnicity on the Air: Reconstructing Américo Paredes’s Radio Career.” The event is part of a series of brown bag talks by CSU scholars working on topics in Latina(o)/Latin American Studies and it will take place in the Morgan Library Event Hall from noon until 1:00 p.m. Coffee and tea will be provided and the event is free and open to all.
  • Debby Thompson’s personal essay “Scavenger Love” was listed as a “notable” in the 2014 Best American Essays.
  • Kristin George Bagdanov’s poem “Purge Body” was accepted for publication in Mid American Review.
  • Maura Smith’s personal essay “Omphalos,” which was part of her 2012 Creative Nonfiction thesis and published in the Bellevue Literary Review, has been named a “Notable” in the 2014 Best American Essays list.

News of Note for the Week of August 25th

libarts-remodel

Eddy Remodel Plan

Welcome to Fall Semester 2014! Please remember that while Eddy is undergoing a remodel, the English Department offices have moved to the Behavioral Sciences Building, Rooms A104-112, (the phone number is the same). Also, the Writing Center was relocated to Johnson Hall Room 119D. Most faculty offices are now located in Ingersoll Hall.

English Department Office Hours: The English Office hours are 7:45 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. (closed during lunch, 12:00-1:00 p.m.). Located in the Behavioral Sciences Building, Room A105.

The Writing Center: The Writing Center will open for limited hours beginning September 2nd, and regular hours September 8th. Temporary location during the Eddy remodel is in Johnson Hall Room 119D (through the building’s south entrance). Also there are evening hours in Morgan Library and TILT. For the full schedule, check out their website at writingcenter.colostate.edu.

In other news:

  • John Calderazzo‘s essay “Traveling with Aliens: How Climate Change Made Me Change My Life,” will appear in High Country News‘ September “Writers and Books” issue. A chapter from John’s book Rising Fire will be republished in Currents of the Universal Being: Explorations in the Literature of Energy, forthcoming from Texas Tech University Press.
  • Camille Dungy’s poem, “Complicit (to breathe together),” has been published in The Best American Poetry 2014.
  • Aparna Gollapudi’s essay, “Personhood, Property Rights, and the Child in John Locke’s Two Treatises of Government and Daniel Defoe’s Fiction” has been accepted for publication in the journal Eighteenth Century Fiction.
  • Sasha Steensen’s long poem on the High Park Fire, “Afire, it itself made” was published by Omniverse: http://omniverse.us/poetry-sasha-steensen/.  She was interviewed for Late Night Library: http://latenightlibrary.org/sasha-steensen/.  Several reviews of her new book House of Deer have appeared.  You can find them at Jacket2: http://jacket2.org/commentary/sasha-steensens-house-deer-other-domestic-histories, The Rumpus: http://therumpus.net/2014/07/house-of-deer-by-sasha-steensen/, Full Stop: http://www.full-stop.net/2014/06/18/reviews/laura-creste/house-of-deer-sasha-steensen/, and American Microreviews: http://www.americanmicroreviews.com/#!house-of-deer-by-sasha-steensen/c
  • Two of Airica Parker’s poems will appear in the next edition of Aurora magazine.
  • Over the summer, Dan Robinson’s personal essay, “Our Taos Hum,” was published in TWJ Magazine; and his short story, “This Blackdamp World,” was published in the anthology Crime and DisOrder. He will present a paper on “The Inexpressibility Topos in Chapter I of Hemingway’s In Our Time” at the “Literature, Memory and the First World War” Conference at the US Military Academy at West Point in a couple of weeks; he was also invited to participate as part of a panel on Hemingway’s Nick Adams Stories in October in Michigan. The paperback release of his first novel, After the Fire, has been put back to Autumn 2015 by Skyhorse Press. His third novel, Death of a Century: A Novel of the Lost Generation, will be published by Arcade Press in June 2015; and the first reading for that novel will be at the US World War I Museum in Kansas City in June 2015.

Upcoming Reading:

09_17GarySnyder-01

News of Note from the Week of March 31st

Find this donation box on a table across from the Eddy Computer Lab if you have some books to share

Find this donation box on the table across from the Eddy Computer Lab if you have some books to share

  • John Calderazzo recently spoke on climate change at the Steamboat Springs Library speaker series. Next week he will speak at The Loveland Connection presentation series on “My Joyful & Difficult Life Helping Scientists Talk to the Public.” In June he’ll speak on communication at a meeting of the American Meteological Society. Later in June he’ll co-lead a three-day yoga/creative writing workshop with department M.A. alum and yoga teacher Jessica Patterson.
  • Gerry Delahunty‘s abstract, A Comparative Analysis of the Rhetorical Moves and Stancetaking in Fundraising and Amnesty International (AI) Appeal Letters, has been accepted for presentation at the Societas Linguistica Europaea conference, 11 – 14 September 2014, in Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland.
  • Todd Mitchell will be attending and presenting at the Colorado Teen Literature Conference in Denver on April 5th. He’ll be giving a presentation on “Using Creative Nonfiction to Inspire Literacy and Creativity,” and another on “Bullying and Suicide Prevention Through Books.” His novel, Backwards, was recently selected as a finalist for the Colorado Author’s League Book Award in the Young Adult Fiction category.
  • Kristin George Bagdanov presented her paper “Barry Lopez’s Ethic of Desire: Learning to Love the Wasteland” last weekend at University of Wyoming’s graduate conference, Searching for Place: Interpretations of the Environment and Landscape.
  • Bill Tremblay‘s poem, “The Colonel Comes Calling,” from Magician’s Hat: Poems on the Life and Art of David Alfaro Siqueiros, Lynx House Press: 2013 was just published in With Eyes Wide Open: Poems of the New American Century, West End Press, Albuquerque: 2014, which will also feature Sam Hamill, Margaret Randall, Bruce Weigl, Afaa S. Weaver, Teresa Mei Chuc, and Yusef Komunyakaa as well as poets from five continents around the world. Bill will read his poems and do a workshop at the University of South Alabama (Mobile, AL) on April 15-16. Bill will judge a poetry contest and do a workshop he’s calling “The Turn” at Arapaho C.C.’s (in Littleton, CO) annual Writer’s Studio on Saturday. He will read with Leslie Ullman. Call Kathryn Winograd 303 797 5815 for details. Or email: Kathryn.Winograd@arapahoe.edu.

News of Note from the Week of March 24th

image by Jill Salahub

image by Jill Salahub

The sun is shining on Eddy Hall this Friday afternoon, and there are many other good things to celebrate as well. Such as,

  • Dan Beachy-Quick will be presenting the Wittreich Lecture at University of Louisville. He’ll be reading an essay titled: “Poetic Geometries: Moby-Dick as Primer to Creative Crisis.” There’s a review of his book on John Keats up at The Philadelphia Review of Books: http://philadelphiareviewofbooks.com/2014/03/24/so-fair-a-form/ And a small collection of his poems from FREE POETRY is just out, titled Drone & Other Poems.
  • John Calderazzo and SueEllen Campbell are giving the Atmospheric Science Department Colloquium on March 29, on the topic of “Talking to Non-Scientists.”
  • SueEllen Campbell took part in a roundtable/workshop in Dallas this week with faculty and professionals in the fabric, textiles, and clothing industry, helping (as a climate change and sustainability educator) with a USDA-funded curriculum project for students in these fields.
  • The North American Review has invited Steven Schwartz to deliver the fiction keynote address at their bicentennial conference in June 2015.
  • Leif Sorensen presented a paper “Sounds of the Post-Dictatorial City: Punk Mappings of Buenos Aires, Montevideo and São Paulo” in a seminar “Punk and the City” at the 2014 meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association in New York City on March 21.
  • Wastershed Review has accepted three of Jerrod Bohn’s poems for publication.
  • Kristin George Bagdanov’s poem “Exchange Body” was given an honorable mention in the 2014 AWP Intro Journals Project competition. Her paper proposal “The Anthropocenic Lyric” was accepted for the 2015 MLA panel, “Anthropocene and Deep Time in Literary Studies,” which is co-sponsored by the divisions of 20th-Century American Literature and Literature and Science.
  • Samantha Iacovetto will be an MFA candidate in Creative Nonfiction at The Ohio State University. She will be attending on a fellowship.
  • Karen Montgomery Moore presented her paper “The Unrealized Potential of Metaphor in Relation to Cancer” this weekend at the “Undoing Health: States of Body and Mind” graduate student interdisciplinary conference at Indiana University-Bloomington. Grateful thanks to Debby Thompson and Katie Adkison for their critical feedback on this work.
  • Tanya Mykhaylychenko (MA in Literature, Summer 2009) has been, since graduating, an OWL tutor for a major publishing and education company, a full-time proposal writer for a small IT staffing agency, and is currently a freelance writing consultant. Following her long-time interest in film theory and history, she was recently admitted to a graduate program in film studies at Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema, Concordia University (Montreal) and awarded a two-year fellowship.