Tag Archives: Ben Findlay

News of Note Week of October 13th

image by Jill Salahub

  • Dan Beachy-Quick is writer-in-residence at Susquehanna University this week. He is visiting Susquehanna as part of the Raji-Syman Visiting Writers Series, and will be giving a reading while there.
  • Tobi Jacobi and Dr. Laura Rogers (Albany College of Health Science and Pharmacy) will deliver a talk entitled “Becoming Incorrigible: The Girls of the Hudson Training School, 1921-32” at the Hudson Area Library in upstate, NY on Oct. 29th.
  • Derek Askey (MFA fiction, 2013) has accepted the position of Editorial Assistant with The Sun in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.
  • Ben Findlay (MFA Spring 2014) started work in Minneapolis as the Development & Publicity assistant at Coffee House Press.
  • Greyrock Review is now accepting submissions! Greyrock Review is an undergraduate anthology at Colorado State University. Submissions are open from October 6, 2014 to December 1, 2014 for original work in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and visual arts. Any undergraduate at CSU may submit their work at https://greyrockreview.submittable.com/submit for free and will be notified by December 15, 2014. Any questions may be sent to editor.csu@gmail.com
  • The first fundraising event for the 2015 Greyrock Review is coming up fast! On October 28th, please join them at CRANKNSTEIN (located in Old Town Fort Collins) for a spectacular reading featuring CSU professors such as Matthew Cooperman and Camille Dungy, as well as graduate and undergraduate CSU writers! During this event there will also be a raffle featuring prizes from local businesses such as Mugs, Bean Cycle, Momo Lolo, and more! Raffle tickets are only $3 each! Other raffle prizes include various novels donated by Old Firehouse Books. Pre-sales for raffle tickets will be held in the Clark C building on October 27 and 28. On these two days only you can get a tasty doughnut AND a raffle ticket for only $3! “Hope to see you all there and thank you for your support!”

Reading Series: Ben Findlay and Kaelyn Riley

At the final MFA reading of the semester, the two readers were Ben Findlay and Kaelyn Riley, a fiction writer and a poet (respectively). The crowd was rather large for the UCA, and because I was early, I had the pleasure of watching people scramble trying to gather enough chairs for the event. When Ben was introduced to the audience, his ability to describe conditions of poverty was praised, and when he read the story he had prepared, “Pressure,” I could see what the introduction had meant.

benfindlay

“We’re smiling in most of the photographs, even if we knew it wouldn’t last…She’s starting to look past me, she’s not looking for a better solution, she’s looking for a better equation.”

The story recounted the tale of a young man named George who works for a glass business, desperately trying to get home to his girlfriend but being constantly held up by the routine of getting paid by a particularly difficult auto repair shop owner. Through his eyes, we see the conditions of poverty and how unfortunate it is to have kidney stones (which made the audience laugh a lot), as well as the toll this lifestyle can have on a relationship. I was so enthralled throughout the entire thing that I decided rather than take careful notes of lines that I liked that I would just record it so I could pay more attention.

I had to do the same thing for the next reader, Kaelyn Riley. As many people filed out of the UCA as soon as Ben finished, I wondered why anyone would want to miss the superb poet that came on stage. While it’s much harder to summarize poetry, many of the ideas presented in Riley’s poetry revolved around what it is to be a woman and what it is to say what you mean, though that does not do her poetry justice. As I walked home that night, I pondered these ideas.

kaelynriley

“’I’d forgotten autumn here,’ I say, lamely, anything, and loathe the poetry of it. The block that we just walked is a termination of the light.”

The final reading of the semester was well worth the time the week before Dead Week. These two readers provided an escape from the grueling hours of studying and writing essays, and I certainly look forward to the series continuing in the fall, even if I will not be writing about them any longer.

~Evelyn Vaughn