Category Archives: Tatiana Nekrasova-Becker

News of Note Week of November 17th

Migrating geese take a break on Ingersoll Hall's front lawn

Migrating geese take a break on Ingersoll Hall’s front lawn

  • Last week, TEFL/TESL faculty and students attended the Annual Co-TESOL Convention in Denver (November 14-15, 2014). Three student-led presentations were delivered at the convention: Angela Sharpe, Moriah Kent and Tatiana Nekrasova-Beker discussed the benefits of Using Corpora in the L2 Classroom; Kenshin Huang and Tatiana Nekrasova-Beker shared their insights on Engaging Asian Students in Classroom Interactions, and Reyila Hadeer and Victor Kuan presented a session on Teacher’s Support during Project-based Learning. Due to the generous support of INTO-CSU, 16 graduate students attended the convention this year.
  • Sarah Sloane gave two presentations, one at a roundtable and another on a featured panel at Writing on the Range, a conference held at University of Denver for college and university faculty from Colorado (and a couple from New Mexico) who do scholarship in the field of writing studies.Her roundtable participation included a discussion of state guidelines for advanced composition classes and a proposal for an advanced writing course that starts by reading Colorado prepper literature. Looking historically at the various permutations of prepper responses to a culture of fear as it has informed 1980s survivalist literature, 1990s prepper handbooks, and contemporary descriptions of potential disasters and 72-hour bug-out bags, students will examine the shaky evidence and rhetorical appeals embedded in YouTube videos, podcasts, social media, listserves like “Vegas Preppers,” and blogs about prepping. Students will then move from reading these flawed rhetorical constructions to composing their own well-supported arguments on a wide range of topics. Students will develop the rhetorical sensitivity and critical acumen necessary to compose within more typical rhetorical situations and Colorado contexts.

    Her featured panel presentation discussed the Colorado State University Composition Program, its location within local, regional, and state contexts, and our program’s collaborative efforts to bring state-of-the-art facilities to support critical analyses of websites, blogs, podcasts, prezis, and new notions of intellectual property, copyright, credibility, the material and the virtual, credibility, representation, and all the many forms, genres, and questions that digital systems, digital publics, and online social networks allow.

  • Leif Sorensen’s essay “Against the Post-Apocalyptic: Narrative Closure in Colson Whitehead’s Zone One,” on the most recent novel by MacArthur genius grant recipient Colson Whitehead is now available in the current issue of Contemporary Literature.

    Professor Sorensen also attended the annual meeting of the Modernist Studies Association in Pittsburgh in early November and presented a paper, “Fragmented Ancestors,” on the literary recoveries of Américo Paredes and D’Arcy McNickle.

  • Graduating English Education student Clint Pendley has accepted a position teaching seventh grade Literacy and English Language Development at Columbia Middle School in Aurora, CO.  Congratulations, Clint!
  • Greyrock Review is now accepting submissions! Greyrock Review is an undergraduate anthology at Colorado State University. Submissions are open from October 6, 2014 to December 1, 2014 for original work in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and visual arts. Any undergraduate at CSU may submit their work at https://greyrockreview.submittable.com/submit for free and will be notified by December 15, 2014. Any questions may be sent to editor.csu@gmail.com
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Faculty Profile: Tatiana Nekrasova-Beker

Dr. Tatiana Nekrasova-Beker is currently teaching graduate courses in the TEFL/TESL program and working with INTO-CSU to help support students in the Pathway program. Tatiana received both her M.A. and Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics from Georgia State University and Northern Arizona University, respectively. Her research interests include usage-based approaches to L2 acquisition, the role of formulaic language in fluency and syntactic development, interactionist approaches to SLA, project-based methods in L2 instruction, and corpus-based analyses of ESP texts. When she is not working, Tatiana likes to travel (AKA attend conferences), go hiking with her husband Tony and their son Mikhael, and do yoga.


How would you describe your work in the English Department?
Very satisfying. I love being in academia and working with students. The grading part is not my favorite, but it is important, too.

What brought you to CSU?
My husband. He started his new position at CSU, so we moved to Fort Collins a few years ago. When a new position in the English department opened up, I felt it was meant to be…

What do you enjoy most about your work?
I like seeing students become excited about their profession, their projects and future prospects.


Why do you think English and the Humanities are important? They help you to understand life in a larger context.


When I was about to submit my college application and could not decide between Chemistry and Philology (Literature + Language), my high school Biology teacher told me this: When you study Literature, each year you feel you expand in what you know in many areas that are related yet different. That helps you to get a more holistic picture of the world you live in and you can talk to people about that. When you study Biology (or Chemistry), you expand your knowledge about a specific topic within the discipline. My teacher was studying rats and their behaviors. As she said, nobody wanted to talk about rats at parties.

What inspired you to pursue a degree in English and teaching?
My very first English teacher. She was sophisticated and very kind, and I liked hearing her British accent.

What had the greatest influence on your career path?
My professors and mentors from Northern Arizona University. I look up to them and hope to be as good as they are one day.

tatiana04

Tatiana with her dissertation co-director and mentor, NAU professor Joan Jamieson

What did you want to be when you were a kid?
Up until I turned 10, I wanted to be a singer or an actress. At 10, when I started learning English in school, I decided that I would be an English teacher.

Can you describe your experience at CSU so far? What do you want to accomplish while you’re here?
My experiences have been very positive. Since the very first summer we came to Fort Collins, colleagues in the department have been extremely supportive and welcoming. It felt nice to have people around who care about your well-being, remember your birthday, and are always happy to help. While I am at CSU, I am hoping to help the TEFL/TESL program grow.


What is your favorite thing about teaching what you teach? The topics we discuss in my classes are complex, but have direct practical applications. I like both – the complexity (as it exercises your brain) and the application (which helps you to stay level-headed).


What is the best advice you’ve ever received?
One of my mentors gave me professional advice: Do not do (or publish) sloppy work. It is a waste of time.

What accomplishments are you most proud of?
Being able to build a life in a foreign country.

What is the last great piece of writing you read? What are you currently reading?
I just finished a co-authored manuscript about the complexity of listening sub-skills. I have read a few great studies with excellent research design, which made them pleasurable reading pieces for me. Outside of academia, I am reading Jo Baker’s Longbourn.

When you’re not working, what do you like to do?
I like to travel, hike, and do yoga.

Which three people, living or dead, would you invite to dinner?
My family (dad, mom, and my sister). We live so far from each other and don’t get to see each other very often, so I would rather enjoy my dinner with them.

News of Note Week of November 3rd

Fall lingers at Ingersoll Hall, even as the snow blows in. Image by Jill Salahub

Fall lingers at Ingersoll Hall, even as the first winter snow blows in. Image by Jill Salahub

  • John Calderazzo will soon give a talk about science communication at the National Wildlife Research Center in Fort Collins.
  • Tobi Jacobi presented a workshop on historical documents from the 1920s New York State Training School for Girls at the Hudson Area Library in late October.
  • Tobi Jacobi presented a critical paper on the popular Netflix series Orange is the New Black and women’s prison writing at the Western States Rhetoric and Literacy conference in Reno, NV in early November.
  • Sasha Steensen and Martin Corless-Smith interviewed one another for The Conversant. You can read the discussion here: http://theconversant.org/?p=8495.
  • Karen Montgomery Moore’s proposal “Reading the Dead Bodies on Bones” was accepted for presentation at the College of Liberal Arts Graduate Student Symposium with the theme “Constructing Humanity” at the University of Nevada-Reno in February. She adds, “They extended their proposal deadline to the 15th! I’d love company!”
  • On Saturday, November 1st, eleven English department faculty members helped award $14,000 in scholarship money at the CSU Senior Scholarship Day. In conjunction with the Admissions Office, Dan Beachy-Quick, Tatiana Nekrasova-Beker, Ellen Brinks, Pam Coke, Ashley Davies, Katie Hoffman, Zach Hutchins, Tobi Jacobi, Ed Lessor, Sarah Sloane, and Leif Sorensen conducted writing workshops with and read timed essays from 91 Colorado high school seniors. We are thankful for their hard work!
  • On October 10-11th, undergraduate and graduate students from the CSU English department attended the Colorado Language Arts Society Regional Conference at the School of Mines in Golden, CO.  Past NCTE@CSU President and current student teacher Tyler Arko served on two separate panels.  Pam Coke moderated one of these panels, and she presented a second session with CSU alum Steven Ray Parker, who is now a full-time English teacher at Kinard Core Knowledge School in Fort Collins.  Student attendees included current NCTE@CSU President Anton Gerth, NCTE@CSU Vice-President Belle Kraxberger, and NCTE@CSU member Jenna FranklinLouann Reid and Antero Garcia attended as well; Antero will be a featured presenter at next year’s conference.
  • For English Department graduating undergraduates and MA graduate students: Thursday, November 13th, 3:30 – 5:00 p.m., Academic Village C141 (Engineering Hall). “Pursuing an MA or PhD in English: Everything You Wanted to Know.” This workshop will focus on the following: what advanced work in higher education entails; how to identify good graduate programs for your needs; what to expect from the application process and how to maximize your chances of success. After a presentation, faculty from various areas of English will be on hand to answer any questions you have and to speak personally about their own experiences.

News of Note for the Week of September 1st

Many English department faculty offices are located in Ingersoll Hall during the Eddy Hall renovations, (image by Jill Salahub)

Many English Department faculty offices are located in Ingersoll Hall during the Eddy Hall renovations, (image by Jill Salahub)

English Department Office Hours: The English Office hours are 7:45 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. (closed during lunch, 12:00-1:00 p.m.). We are located in the Behavioral Sciences Building, Room A105.

  • Omnidawn will be publishing a chapbook by Dan Beachy-Quick titled Shields & Shards & Stitches & Songs this spring. Poems from it have just appeared on The Academy of American Poets “poem-a-day” site as well as large selection at the online journal Fogged Clarity.
  • Leslee Becker has received a writing residency at the Brush Creek Foundation Ranch in Wyoming.
  • Tatiana Nekrasova-Beker, Yana Rozanova, and Tony Becker will be presenting their topic, Examining ESP Course Materials: Language Exposure and Learning Opportunities, on September 26th at the 2014 American Association for Corpus Linguistics in Flagstaff, AZ.
  • Matthew Cooperman and Dan Beachy-Quick both have poems up at the latest Fogged Clarity. In addition, there are interviews with both of them, and snappy photos. http://foggedclarity.com

News of Note from the Week of April 14th

Things are blooming at Eddy Hall

Things are blooming at Eddy Hall, image by Jill Salahub

  • There’s a review of various work Dan Beachy-Quick has written at Pleiades: http://www.ucmo.edu/pleiades/news/Tayson.html, and a short essay about the tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary, “The Fragile Bow: On Imagination and Atrocity” is published at Ghost Proposal: http://www.ghostproposal.com/issue4/danbeachyquick.php
  • Tatiana Nekrasova-Becker and Tony Becker will be presenting their topic, Evaluating a Project-Based Activity: Moving from Theory to Practice at the K-12 and University Level (Integrating STEM Content and Foreign Language Education), on April 19th at the 2014 Symposium on Languages for Specific Purposes in Boulder, CO.
  • Lisa Langstraat, Sue Doe, Emily Morgan, Nancy Henke, and Vani Kannan presented a roundtable at the Conference on College Composition and Communication, 4C’s, on March 21. The presentation focused on the CO150 course reader, The Ethics of Higher Education, and a research study conducted in the fall on the potential effects of curriculum and curricular intervention on student, faculty, and public attitudes toward academic labor issues. Maria Maisto, President and Executive Director of the New Faculty Majority, was respondent.
  • The latest issue of AWP Writer’s Chronicle includes a feature interview on Camille Dungy.
  • Last weekend, Roze Hentschell participated in a seminar at the annual meeting of the Shakespeare Association of America in St. Louis. She presented new work, “Paul’s Boys: Actors, Choristers, Students, and Children in St. Paul’s Cathedral Precinct,” which is part of her book-in-progress.
  • Airica Parker’s poetry will appear in CALYX Vol. 28, No. 2.

Upcoming Events of Interest

  • April 21, 2014: Literature MA Showcase at Cranknstein, 215B N. College Avenue. Monday, 4:00-7:00pm – Remarks and presentations start at 4:45 pm.
  • April 24, 2014: Reading Series – Robert Hass & Brenda Hillman (Poetry), Thursday, 7:30pm North Ballroom in the Lory Student Center.
  • April 27, 2014: Slamogadro Poetry Slam – Avogadro’s Number will be hosting a Poetry Slam on the final Sunday of every month, April 27th is the first one. 7:00pm signup 7:30 start – All are welcome.
  • May 1, 2014: Reading Series – Kaelyn Riley & Ben Findlay MFA Thesis Reading (Poetry & Fiction), Thursday, 7:30pm University Art Museum.

News of Note from the Week of April 7th

springovereddy

image by Jill Salahub

  • Dan Beachy-Quick is speaking at the Finding Moby-Dick Symposium at Northwestern University. His  long poem, “Inf-, Inf-” has been accepted by The Seattle Review. And, there’s a new review of his John Keats book at New Pages: http://www.newpages.com/bookreviews/2014-04-01/#Brighter-Word-Than-Bright-Dan-Beachy-Quick
  • Tony Becker, Tatiana Nekrasova-Becker, and Bert Vermeulen have had their proposal, Teaching Content and Language to International Engineering Students, accepted for inclusion at the ACTFL 2014 Convention in San Antonio, TX.
  • Who Are Your Favorite Poets?, a post on the Creative Writing Program blog by Camille Dungy. “When I am asked, as I am almost weekly asked, if I can list my favorite poets, I recount a list of five to ten writers. The list invariably includes Robert Hass and Brenda Hillman. Imagine how excited I am that these two writers are coming to Fort Collins to celebrate National Poetry Month at CSU.” Hass and Hillman are coming to campus April 24th (Lory Student Center, North Ballroom, 7:30 pm). This event is free and open to the public.