Category Archives: Louann Reid

Thankful for Giving: a Note from the Chair

louannRecently, I attended the College of Liberal Arts Donors Brunch. This annual event honors the many scholarship donors who support CLA and the students who benefit. It is fitting that it occurs in November, a month when we are reminded to reflect on all that we have to be thankful for and remember those who need our help. This year’s brunch made me think again about why I give to CSU because I was the featured speaker.

I was a first-generation college student who would not be here now without the encouragement of my parents and the generosity of scholarship donors. Dean Gill introduced me by saying that I would speak about a new chapter in my story as an educator.

Here’s the story I told.

My new chapter opens with a bequest that my husband and I recently decided to make to the English department. But the story behind it is a story of the encouragement of parents who wanted for their children the education they could not have and the generous support of scholarship donors.

When I was two years old, my parents bought the first of many Series E US Savings Bonds and started a college savings account at the bank.

When I was four years old, they bought a set of the American Peoples encyclopedias that my mother had in her home until she moved to assisted living at age 84.

Before I started school, my parents found an old wooden school desk with a flip top lid so that I could play school with my younger siblings and dolls. At least the dolls were cooperative.

Neither of my parents had gone beyond high school and our family of five lived on what my father earned as an auto mechanic, but college was never a question. Paying for it was.

I chose a liberal arts college not only for the education but because the combination of scholarships and financial aid made it possible for me to go. When my parents dropped me off at school, I knew they were proud. Later my mother confided that my father cried as they drove away.

A few months later, my father died suddenly, and I didn’t know if we could afford for me to stay in school. Financial aid, work-study grants, and the generosity of scholarship donors made it possible for me to stay.

After college I went on to teach junior and senior high school for 19 years and earned 2 more degrees. When I successfully defended my dissertation, my mother sent flowers to Dr. Reid. She never tired of telling the story of correcting the florist when the florist asked for his address. “Dr. Reid is my daughter,” she said.

When I took the position at CSU, she turned to the encyclopedias they had bought so long ago to learn about where I would be teaching, but if you think a minute about the age of those encyclopedias, you’ll know what she found instead. She called and said “Did you mean you are going to Colorado A&M?”

Education mattered to my parents and it matters to us. Dave and I have always believed in giving to what matters, and we believe in the future of CSU. We want to ensure opportunities for generations of students to get an education that matters to them and to society.

I am thankful for the generosity that made my education possible.

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News of Note Week of November 3rd

Fall lingers at Ingersoll Hall, even as the snow blows in. Image by Jill Salahub

Fall lingers at Ingersoll Hall, even as the first winter snow blows in. Image by Jill Salahub

  • John Calderazzo will soon give a talk about science communication at the National Wildlife Research Center in Fort Collins.
  • Tobi Jacobi presented a workshop on historical documents from the 1920s New York State Training School for Girls at the Hudson Area Library in late October.
  • Tobi Jacobi presented a critical paper on the popular Netflix series Orange is the New Black and women’s prison writing at the Western States Rhetoric and Literacy conference in Reno, NV in early November.
  • Sasha Steensen and Martin Corless-Smith interviewed one another for The Conversant. You can read the discussion here: http://theconversant.org/?p=8495.
  • Karen Montgomery Moore’s proposal “Reading the Dead Bodies on Bones” was accepted for presentation at the College of Liberal Arts Graduate Student Symposium with the theme “Constructing Humanity” at the University of Nevada-Reno in February. She adds, “They extended their proposal deadline to the 15th! I’d love company!”
  • On Saturday, November 1st, eleven English department faculty members helped award $14,000 in scholarship money at the CSU Senior Scholarship Day. In conjunction with the Admissions Office, Dan Beachy-Quick, Tatiana Nekrasova-Beker, Ellen Brinks, Pam Coke, Ashley Davies, Katie Hoffman, Zach Hutchins, Tobi Jacobi, Ed Lessor, Sarah Sloane, and Leif Sorensen conducted writing workshops with and read timed essays from 91 Colorado high school seniors. We are thankful for their hard work!
  • On October 10-11th, undergraduate and graduate students from the CSU English department attended the Colorado Language Arts Society Regional Conference at the School of Mines in Golden, CO.  Past NCTE@CSU President and current student teacher Tyler Arko served on two separate panels.  Pam Coke moderated one of these panels, and she presented a second session with CSU alum Steven Ray Parker, who is now a full-time English teacher at Kinard Core Knowledge School in Fort Collins.  Student attendees included current NCTE@CSU President Anton Gerth, NCTE@CSU Vice-President Belle Kraxberger, and NCTE@CSU member Jenna FranklinLouann Reid and Antero Garcia attended as well; Antero will be a featured presenter at next year’s conference.
  • For English Department graduating undergraduates and MA graduate students: Thursday, November 13th, 3:30 – 5:00 p.m., Academic Village C141 (Engineering Hall). “Pursuing an MA or PhD in English: Everything You Wanted to Know.” This workshop will focus on the following: what advanced work in higher education entails; how to identify good graduate programs for your needs; what to expect from the application process and how to maximize your chances of success. After a presentation, faculty from various areas of English will be on hand to answer any questions you have and to speak personally about their own experiences.

Update: Eddy Remodel

Department Chair Louann Reid and Office Manager Amparo Jeffrey recently took a tour of Eddy Hall, which is currently being remodeled.

louannandamparohardhat

Safety first!

Here are some pictures Amparo took, as well as a few “before” pictures Jill Salahub took in the weeks before the big move.

Third floor of Eddy hallway, before

Third floor of Eddy hallway, before

Third floor of Eddy hallway, now

Third floor of Eddy hallway, now

Third floor Eddy back hall, before

Third floor Eddy back hall, before

Third floor Eddy, back hall, now ADA compliant with added office space

Third floor Eddy, back hall, now ADA compliant with added office space

The Writing Center, now

The Writing Center, now

The center courtyard, before

The center courtyard, before

The center courtyard, now

The center courtyard, now

Eddy first floor Lounge in North Hallway, now

Eddy first floor Lounge in North Hallway, now, (also, Louann in a hard hat)

Third floor Eddy Computer Lab, before

Eddy 300 Computer Lab, before

Eddy 300 Computer Lab, now

Eddy 300 Computer Lab, now

Louann contemplating the new lounge space in front of the Eddy 300 Computer Lab

Louann contemplating the new lounge space in front of the Eddy 300 Computer Lab

Notes from the Chair

louann

Hello! My name is Louann Reid. I have been department chair since 2011 and a faculty member at CSU for 20 years. I am thrilled that we are launching this department-wide blog. In it we can showcase the people, programs, and publications that are the life and shape of our vibrant and diverse department.  We hope that alumni, faculty, and both current and potential students will find much of interest here.

Under the editorship of Jill Salahub, posts from our communications interns and others, and feedback from you, the readers, this blog will become a virtual community of readers, writers, and thinkers who are passionate about all that English studies offers. In my posts, I will highlight department news or comment on relevant topics circulating on the Internet or on social media. Sometimes, like today, I will share a favorite text. This is one of my favorite poems by CSU Professor Emeritus Mary Crow and comes from her collection, Borders.

Hard Things: Colorado

Home: Goat mountain, frozen hillside,
shale rubble on the slope
where I struggled to climb
against the slipping and slippery
scrim up to the small caves,
lairs of mountain lions, or old graves
full of fine dark dust.

I used to drive home, feeling the weight
lift off my shoulders mile after mile.
Friends asked how I could bear
living so far out, but I loved
driving toward the light, turning into the gate,
the dog and horses racing to greet me,
the sound of the river pounding against
my ego, my pitiless self.