Category Archives: Camille Dungy

News of Note Week of November 9th

image by Jill Salahub

image by Jill Salahub

  • SueEllen Campbell ran a workshop on teaching climate change in literature classes at the Western Literature Association conference on November 7 in Victoria, B.C.
  • VCU’s literary journal, Blackbird, has published three of Camille Dungy’s poems: http://www.blackbird.vcu.edu/v13n2/poetry/dungy_c/index.shtml
  • Ecotone, a literary journal published by the University of North Carolina-Wilmington, recently published “Differentiation,” an essay that chronicles some of the highlights of the trip Camille Dungy took to Barrow, Alaska this February: http://www.ecotonejournal.com/index.php/articles/details/differentiation
  • Sasha Steensen will be reading in Iowa City at Prairie Lights Books on November 18th and in Chicago at Danny’s on November 19th.
  • Debby Thompson’s “Strange Rays, Indeed,” a personal essay about radioactivity, has been nominated by Chautauqua for a Pushcart Prize.

News of Note Week of October 20th

Ingersoll Hall in Fall, image by Jill Salahub

Ingersoll Hall in Fall, image by Jill Salahub

  • SueEllen Campbell and John Calderazzo recently gave a talk at Northern Arizona University, “The Real Work: Facing Climate Change.” They were also interviewed on the local NPR station. John also spoke to an environmental communications class.
  • A portfolio of essays on “The Work of Poetry” has just been released by Free Verse, including, among various riches, work by Matthew Cooperman and Dan Beachy-Quick. The special feature marks the 25th edition of Free Verse, and can be found at http://english.chass.ncsu.edu/freeverse/Archives/2014/prose/WorkOfPoetry.html
  • The most recent issue of Shakespeare Studies, vol. 42, is now available. This issue includes Barbara Sebek’s contribution to a forum on “Diet and Identity in Shakespeare’s England,” edited by Kim Coles and Gitanjali Shahani Chopra.
  • Todd Mitchell ran two writing and craft sessions at ReadCon — a High Plains Library District Event in Greeley to celebrate texts and the creation of texts. Here’s an article from Thursday’s Greeley Tribune with more information on the event: http://www.greeleytribune.com/entertainment/13486821-113/readcon-greeley-downtown-event Lit Pick recently did an author interview with Todd Mitchell. If you’re curious to learn how love letters, DFW, and snakes have influenced Todd, you can find the interview here: http://www.litpick.com/author/todd-mitchell
  • Daniel Owen, INTO adjunct, has accepted an appointment as an English Language Fellow from the Department of State.  He will have a 10-month Fellowship in Yamousoukro, Cote d’Ivoire.  He will be teaching at National Polytechnic Institute Felix Houphouet Boigny (INPHB). INPHB is a prestigious public university with undergraduate and graduate degree programs in sciences, engineering, and business.  He will be teaching general English courses and business English at both the undergraduate and graduate level.
  • Sue Ring deRosset, (MA, Creative Nonfiction, Summer 2013), teaches creative writing workshops at Front Range Community College, recently taught a workshop through Northern Colorado Writers, and is a freelance editorial consultant for memoirists and novelists. Chapter 1 of her thesis, a memoir, appeared in the Spring 2013 Front Range Review as a stand-alone essay titled “The Chambered Nautilus.” Since graduation, she’s had poems published in the Rocky Mountain NP Poetic Inventory and online, and an essay published in the Fort Collins Courier. A book on vultures, the first in a series of limited-edition, hand-bound, letterpress books, is forthcoming from Wolverine Farm Publishing.
  • Greyrock Review Fundraiser Reading at Cranknstein Tuesday, October 28, 2014 at 7 pm to raise money for publication. Camille Dungy, Matthew Cooperman and others will read, and there will be many fabulous prizes!
  • Greyrock Review is now accepting submissions! Greyrock Review is an undergraduate anthology at Colorado State University. Submissions are open from October 6, 2014 to December 1, 2014 for original work in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and visual arts. Any undergraduate at CSU may submit their work at https://greyrockreview.submittable.com/submit for free and will be notified by December 15, 2014. Any questions may be sent to editor.csu@gmail.com

Three English Faculty Who Take Teaching and Learning Beyond Eddy Hall

Eddy Hall is empty. “Where Did They Go?” banners direct students to the Writing Center in Johnson Hall and to the three buildings housing Philosophy and English faculty and staff: Clark, Behavioral Sciences, and Ingersoll Hall, where dorm rooms have become offices. Despite the relocations, English faculty continue to demonstrate that innovative teaching and learning are more about people than place. They are reaching beyond the traditional classroom in exciting ways. Here are just three examples.

dan-beachy-quickFrom Dan Beachy-Quick:

On July 22-24, 2015 we’ll be hosting a 3-day interdisciplinary symposium organized around the theme of “Crisis & Creativity.” In an effort to find a useful dialogue between sciences and arts in relation to the pressing issues of the day, we’ll be looking at “crisis” in all its forms — from sociological definition of an event that affects every strata of society, to the political in which crisis reveals the underlying disorders that allow injustice of many sorts to persist, to “crisis” as a primary metaphor for those purposes and motions that result in the making of a work of art.

Poet and activist Brenda Hillman, artist and curator Michael Swaine, and a colleague (soon to be determined) from CSU’s own esteemed faculty on Environmental Sustainability, will lead a group of writers, artists, educators, archeologists, scientists drawn from near and far through morning workshops designed to foster engaged collaboration across disciplines too often at a distance from one another.

Each afternoon will include open house “maker’s spaces” in which the community will be invited to join the conversation and its larger hopes of creating work of many sorts that address those crises affecting us all. Each evening will conclude with a public event: round-table discussion, presentation of work, and a reading/presentation by those involed in the workshop. We’ll also have a website that invites all who visit it to join in the effort of the whole, be they here or afar — details in greater abundance are soon to come.

Dungy_headshot1From Camille Dungy:

This semester, in E479, Recent US Poetry, students have the chance to meet seven acclaimed contemporary poets. American Book Award winner Jericho Brown, Kingsley Tufts winner Matthea Harvey, Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award finalist Adrian Matjeka, National Poetry series winning Julie Carr and Yale Younger Prize winning Eduardo Corral are among the esteemed poets who will visit the class either in person or via teleconference.

After having read a book by each author as well as selected accompanying poems that demonstrate the robustness of contemporary poetry, students have the opportunity to speak directly with each poet about his or her influences, poetics, and practice. We’re learning a lot, and we’re having fun, too!

antero02From Antero Garcia:

Through a Creative Works Commercialization Award from CSU Ventures, Antero Garcia is currently developing The Educator’s Game Design Toolkit. Created in collaboration with a current high school teacher, this project is focused on developing a commercially viable product for teachers and teacher educators to increase the preparation of students’ 21st century learning. Building off of Antero’s research on game design within schools, this product will allow teachers to collaborate and create powerful gaming-centered opportunities in which youth can learn.

Faculty Profile: Camille Dungy

Camille Dungy is author of Smith Blue (Southern Illinois University Press, 2011), winner of the 2010 Crab Orchard Open Book Prize, Suck on the Marrow (Red Hen Press, 2010), and What to Eat, What to Drink, What to Leave for Poison (Red Hen Press, 2006).

Dungy is editor of Black Nature: Four Centuries of African American Nature Poetry (UGA, 2009), co-editor of From the Fishouse: An Anthology of Poems that Sing, Rhyme, Resound, Syncopate, Alliterate, and Just Plain Sound Great (Persea, 2009), and assistant editor of Gathering Ground: A Reader Celebrating Cave Canem’s First Decade (University of Michigan Press, 2006). Dungy has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Virginia Commission for the Arts, Cave Canem, the Dana Award, and Bread Loaf.

She is a two-time recipient of the Northern California Book Award (2010 and 2011), a Silver Medal Winner in the California Book Award (2011), and a two-time NAACP Image Award nominee (2010 and 2011). She was a 2011 finalist for the Balcones Prize, and her books have been shortlisted for the 2011 Foreword Magazine Book of the Year Award, the PEN Center USA 2007 Literary Award, and the Library of Virginia 2007 Literary Award. Recently a Professor in the Creative Writing Department at San Francisco State University, Dungy is now a Professor in the English Department at Colorado State University. Her poems and essays have been published widely in anthologies and print and online journals.

~Bio excerpted from Camille Dungy’s website

Dungy_headshot4


Faculty Profile: Camille Dungy
by Denise Jarrott

How would you describe your work in the English Department?
I teach creative writing and literature classes, mostly focusing on poetry. Right now I’m teaching a poetry writing workshop and a course on Recent US Poetry. Over the course of the semester, seven poets will visit our class either in person or via teleconference. We’re all looking forward to the chance to speak directly with some of today’s hottest authors.

What brought you to CSU?
I am excited about the university’s commitment to serving the students of the state of Colorado. I’ve been away a long time, but I’m actually a Colorado native, and I am happy to be a part of keeping this a vibrant place. I am also thrilled by the engagement of so many of my colleagues in questions directly related to the environment and sustainability as well as history, family, and great literature.

What do you enjoy most about your work?
I am happy every day that I am able to wake up and think about what I love best: good writing.


Why do you think English and the Humanities are important?  English and the Humanities teach us to think critically, to read carefully (and not only text on the page), and engage empathy. In short, English and the Humanities help form the rudimentary components of engaged citizenship.


What inspired you to pursue a degree in English and teaching?
Why not do what I love?

What had the greatest influence on your career path?
I was raised in a house that valued books, that valued education, and that valued compassion. My education also supported these interests, and so here I am, passing those values along.

What did you want to be when you were a kid?
A writer. (And also a doctor and a piano player and an athlete and probably a lot of other things. Good thing all those pursuits, which require focus and practice and attention to detail, supported my main goal of learning how to be a better writer).

Describe your experience on your recent sabbatical and how you will bring what you learned during that time to CSU.
I did take a leave last semester to write, and I traveled to Alaska, California, London, Paris, and Seattle in pursuit of my subjects. The love of travel, the engagement with a world that is larger than our neighborhoods (but also amazingly smaller: I met a woman in Barrow, Alaska who had met her husband at restaurant 2 blocks from the restaurant where I met my husband, and when I was in Paris I had lunch with a friend from the States) helps me to read the world better. Reading the world better helps me read books better. Reading books better helps me write and teach books better.

What moment in the classroom stands out as most memorable?
I have been teaching full time since 1997. If I had one most memorable moment it would diminish the many other wonderful (and sometime challenging) moments I’ve had in all those years in the classroom.

What is your favorite thing about teaching?
I love talking about what I love to people who are open to the possibility of learning new things about themselves and the world.


What advice would you give a student taking classes in the English department?  Be open to the possibility of learning new things about yourself and the world.


What is the best advice you’ve ever received?
As a person who is open to learning new things about myself and the world, I get advice all the time. I’ve to categorize this advice in terms of its relevance to me, but I’ve also learned to revisit advice because things that don’t seem relevant on Day 1 might be really useful on Day 121.

Dungy_headshot1

What accomplishments are you most proud of?
I’m raising a daughter who is smart and self assured and kind to others, and that makes me quite proud. I also have published several of my own books and edited anthologies that represent a wide range of voices, and that these words are out of my head (where so many of our ideas linger) and in the world makes me quite proud. But, I don’t tend to dwell too much in pride. Every day is a new day, and each new day requires more writing, more parenting, more living actively in the world.

What is the last great piece of writing you read? What are you currently reading?
I read for a living. I read all the time. Two days ago I would have told you the best book I’ve read recently was the book I read two days ago (The White Pages, by Martha Collins), but yesterday I taught and so reread portions of The Apple Trees at Olema by Robert Hass, which is a book I adore, and tonight I have a stack of books on my desk including Yona Harvey’s Hemming the Water and Brilliant: The Evolution of Artificial Light by Jane Brox, both of which I am really excited about.

When you’re not working, what do you like to do?
I love to cook. I love to be outside, hiking or walking or just being. I love to be with my family. I love to read, which is and is not work for me. I am also turning into a bit of a DIY gal, and have a long list of projects for the house (which may or may not ever get done), including building a cold frame and hanging barn doors in a room that needs a divider.

What is your favorite word and why?
Lathe. Just listen to it. A gorgeous word. It’s round and cylindrical, a word that sounds like what it does. Lathe. I love that word.

Which three people, living or dead, would you invite to dinner?
I just had this conversation with someone! I invited Octavia Butler, one of my all time favorite writers (Parable of the Sower and Kindred are my two favorite books). Also Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley because I am amazed by the mind that invented Frankenstein while pregnant (which, I think, is fascinating enough even without the fact that the book itself is a marvel). And maybe…the third person is always the tricky one…perhaps my maternal grandmother, who I believe would get a kick out of meeting those women and who would be glad to teach them a thing or two and maybe recite some poems.

News of Note for the Week of August 25th

libarts-remodel

Eddy Remodel Plan

Welcome to Fall Semester 2014! Please remember that while Eddy is undergoing a remodel, the English Department offices have moved to the Behavioral Sciences Building, Rooms A104-112, (the phone number is the same). Also, the Writing Center was relocated to Johnson Hall Room 119D. Most faculty offices are now located in Ingersoll Hall.

English Department Office Hours: The English Office hours are 7:45 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. (closed during lunch, 12:00-1:00 p.m.). Located in the Behavioral Sciences Building, Room A105.

The Writing Center: The Writing Center will open for limited hours beginning September 2nd, and regular hours September 8th. Temporary location during the Eddy remodel is in Johnson Hall Room 119D (through the building’s south entrance). Also there are evening hours in Morgan Library and TILT. For the full schedule, check out their website at writingcenter.colostate.edu.

In other news:

  • John Calderazzo‘s essay “Traveling with Aliens: How Climate Change Made Me Change My Life,” will appear in High Country News‘ September “Writers and Books” issue. A chapter from John’s book Rising Fire will be republished in Currents of the Universal Being: Explorations in the Literature of Energy, forthcoming from Texas Tech University Press.
  • Camille Dungy’s poem, “Complicit (to breathe together),” has been published in The Best American Poetry 2014.
  • Aparna Gollapudi’s essay, “Personhood, Property Rights, and the Child in John Locke’s Two Treatises of Government and Daniel Defoe’s Fiction” has been accepted for publication in the journal Eighteenth Century Fiction.
  • Sasha Steensen’s long poem on the High Park Fire, “Afire, it itself made” was published by Omniverse: http://omniverse.us/poetry-sasha-steensen/.  She was interviewed for Late Night Library: http://latenightlibrary.org/sasha-steensen/.  Several reviews of her new book House of Deer have appeared.  You can find them at Jacket2: http://jacket2.org/commentary/sasha-steensens-house-deer-other-domestic-histories, The Rumpus: http://therumpus.net/2014/07/house-of-deer-by-sasha-steensen/, Full Stop: http://www.full-stop.net/2014/06/18/reviews/laura-creste/house-of-deer-sasha-steensen/, and American Microreviews: http://www.americanmicroreviews.com/#!house-of-deer-by-sasha-steensen/c
  • Two of Airica Parker’s poems will appear in the next edition of Aurora magazine.
  • Over the summer, Dan Robinson’s personal essay, “Our Taos Hum,” was published in TWJ Magazine; and his short story, “This Blackdamp World,” was published in the anthology Crime and DisOrder. He will present a paper on “The Inexpressibility Topos in Chapter I of Hemingway’s In Our Time” at the “Literature, Memory and the First World War” Conference at the US Military Academy at West Point in a couple of weeks; he was also invited to participate as part of a panel on Hemingway’s Nick Adams Stories in October in Michigan. The paperback release of his first novel, After the Fire, has been put back to Autumn 2015 by Skyhorse Press. His third novel, Death of a Century: A Novel of the Lost Generation, will be published by Arcade Press in June 2015; and the first reading for that novel will be at the US World War I Museum in Kansas City in June 2015.

Upcoming Reading:

09_17GarySnyder-01

News of Note from the Week of May 5th

image by Jill Salahub

image by Jill Salahub

Did you know that Eddy Hall is undergoing a remodel? It will begin soon and take about 16 months. This week, they put up one panel of the new facade on the south side of the building (see above image), and half of the third floor is packing their things into boxes to be temporarily moved into other locations while the work takes place. The English Department main offices will move over to the Behavioral Sciences Building, Rooms 104-112, (the phone number will remain the same). Stay tuned!

Today is the last of Spring 2014 classes! Good luck to everyone on finals, as well as final papers and projects, teachers and students, and a special wish for the best of luck to our graduating seniors.

  • Libby James (MA English ’71) is a local and national running legend who lives here in Fort Collins. She is featured in this great story on ESPNW, Libby was also featured recently in an article in the Denver Post, “Libby James, 75, ready for Colorado Running Hall of Fame.”
  • Leslee Becker’s story, “The Bonaventure,” has been accepted for publication in The Vermont Literary Review.
  • Two of Camille Dungy’s poems were translated into French and published in a special section of Siècle 21: Littèrature & Société edited by Marilyn Hacker.
  • EJ Levy will judge Tupelo Quarterly’s Open Prose Contest (Prize $1,000): May 27, 2014, deadline. For additional information, see: https://tupeloquarterly.submittable.com/submit/29128  EJ’s essay “Bread” appears in the current issue of The Normal School. EJ’s short-short story “Talk to Her” appeared in Kenyon Review online in April.
    https://www.kenyonreview.org/kr-online-issue/2014-spring/selections/e-j-levy-342846/
  • Sasha Steensen’s new book House of Deer is now out with Fence Books: http://www.fenceportal.org/?page_id=5195. She has several new poems out in the latest issue of Jubilat, and next week she leaves for a week-long reading tour on the east coast.
  • Beth Lechleitner’s mezzo-soprano daughter, Kate Mathews, will be presenting Copland’s settings of 12 Emily Dickinson poems on June 7, at 7:30 p.m. at the Magnolia Music Studio (210 W. Magnolia, Corner of Magnolia and Mason). Tickets available at: http://emilydickinson.brownpapertickets.com/ To learn more about Kate, visit her website:  http://www.katemathews.com/
  • Man in the Moon: Essays on Fathers & Fatherhood, published by the Center for Literary Publishing and distributed by the University Press of Colorado, is now available (www.upcolorado.com or amazon.com). The anthology features essays selected from several literary magazines and includes work by our own Debby Thompson and Dan Beachy-Quick, plus many other fine writers.
  • The University of Nebraska Press, observing that they consider it a “lasting contribution to Western literature,” recently released a Bison Books paperback edition of David Mogen’s memoir, Honyocker Dreams, Montana Memories (2011).

News of Note from the Week of April 14th

Things are blooming at Eddy Hall

Things are blooming at Eddy Hall, image by Jill Salahub

  • There’s a review of various work Dan Beachy-Quick has written at Pleiades: http://www.ucmo.edu/pleiades/news/Tayson.html, and a short essay about the tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary, “The Fragile Bow: On Imagination and Atrocity” is published at Ghost Proposal: http://www.ghostproposal.com/issue4/danbeachyquick.php
  • Tatiana Nekrasova-Becker and Tony Becker will be presenting their topic, Evaluating a Project-Based Activity: Moving from Theory to Practice at the K-12 and University Level (Integrating STEM Content and Foreign Language Education), on April 19th at the 2014 Symposium on Languages for Specific Purposes in Boulder, CO.
  • Lisa Langstraat, Sue Doe, Emily Morgan, Nancy Henke, and Vani Kannan presented a roundtable at the Conference on College Composition and Communication, 4C’s, on March 21. The presentation focused on the CO150 course reader, The Ethics of Higher Education, and a research study conducted in the fall on the potential effects of curriculum and curricular intervention on student, faculty, and public attitudes toward academic labor issues. Maria Maisto, President and Executive Director of the New Faculty Majority, was respondent.
  • The latest issue of AWP Writer’s Chronicle includes a feature interview on Camille Dungy.
  • Last weekend, Roze Hentschell participated in a seminar at the annual meeting of the Shakespeare Association of America in St. Louis. She presented new work, “Paul’s Boys: Actors, Choristers, Students, and Children in St. Paul’s Cathedral Precinct,” which is part of her book-in-progress.
  • Airica Parker’s poetry will appear in CALYX Vol. 28, No. 2.

Upcoming Events of Interest

  • April 21, 2014: Literature MA Showcase at Cranknstein, 215B N. College Avenue. Monday, 4:00-7:00pm – Remarks and presentations start at 4:45 pm.
  • April 24, 2014: Reading Series – Robert Hass & Brenda Hillman (Poetry), Thursday, 7:30pm North Ballroom in the Lory Student Center.
  • April 27, 2014: Slamogadro Poetry Slam – Avogadro’s Number will be hosting a Poetry Slam on the final Sunday of every month, April 27th is the first one. 7:00pm signup 7:30 start – All are welcome.
  • May 1, 2014: Reading Series – Kaelyn Riley & Ben Findlay MFA Thesis Reading (Poetry & Fiction), Thursday, 7:30pm University Art Museum.