Daily Archives: November 17, 2014

English Department Communications Internship: Spring 2015

Tim Mahoney

Tim Mahoney

It has been so much fun to work with Communications Intern Tim Mahoney this semester. He has done some really great work — endeavored to build community, grew the audience for department publications, shared lots of interesting ideas, is a good writer and so enthusiastic — but the semester is almost over and he’s graduating, so it’s time to find two new interns. Maybe one might be you?


English Department Communications Internship
Number of positions: 2
Internship term: Spring 2015 Semester, 15 weeks, January 20th – May 8th, 2015
Total credits: 2
Hours: 80 hours (40 per credit hour), approximately 5 per week
Stipend: $500
Application Deadline: Friday, November 21st by 12:00 p.m.

The English Department is looking for two engaged, self-motivated, responsible, creative, and enthusiastic CSU students, undergraduate or graduate, with good communication and writing skills to help tell the story of the English Department. The interns in this position will help facilitate communication and community with students, faculty, staff, alumni and friends of the English Department.

Interns will spend most of their time researching, interviewing, attending events, writing, and developing content — both for print and online. A major responsibility of this internship will be creating content for the department’s blog, https://englishcsu.wordpress.com/. Interns will work directly with the English department’s Communications Coordinator to meet departmental communication needs and complete various content development projects as assigned, including but not limited to creating profiles of people (alumni, faculty & staff, students), programs and projects; conducting interviews; providing event coverage (which would include attendance and photos, along with other modes of recording where relevant); and reporting departmental news and upcoming events.

For these internship positions, some prior reporting or blogging experience and/or education is preferred, as well as an understanding of principles for writing for the web and strong communication skills, both in person and in text. We also prefer applicants who are familiar with the English Department, its programs, people, and events – and who are willing to learn more. Content will be developed in various modes, and therefore skill with technologies such as sound recording and photography, as well as image and sound editing experience is preferred. We are also looking for interns with good people skills, the ability to participate in effective verbal and written exchanges, understanding that as they attend events and conduct interviews and such, they are acting as a “goodwill ambassador” for the department.

Applicants should email or hand deliver to the English Department main office the following: a cover letter, résumé, contact information for three references (phone and email), and three writing samples (plus multimedia samples, if applicable) by the application deadline to:

English Department
c/o Jill Salahub: Communications Coordinator
Jill.Salahub@colostate.edu
A105 Behavioral Sciences Bldg.
1773 Campus Delivery
Ft. Collins, CO 80523-1773

News of Note Week of November 9th

image by Jill Salahub

image by Jill Salahub

  • SueEllen Campbell ran a workshop on teaching climate change in literature classes at the Western Literature Association conference on November 7 in Victoria, B.C.
  • VCU’s literary journal, Blackbird, has published three of Camille Dungy’s poems: http://www.blackbird.vcu.edu/v13n2/poetry/dungy_c/index.shtml
  • Ecotone, a literary journal published by the University of North Carolina-Wilmington, recently published “Differentiation,” an essay that chronicles some of the highlights of the trip Camille Dungy took to Barrow, Alaska this February: http://www.ecotonejournal.com/index.php/articles/details/differentiation
  • Sasha Steensen will be reading in Iowa City at Prairie Lights Books on November 18th and in Chicago at Danny’s on November 19th.
  • Debby Thompson’s “Strange Rays, Indeed,” a personal essay about radioactivity, has been nominated by Chautauqua for a Pushcart Prize.

Thankful for Giving: a Note from the Chair

louannRecently, I attended the College of Liberal Arts Donors Brunch. This annual event honors the many scholarship donors who support CLA and the students who benefit. It is fitting that it occurs in November, a month when we are reminded to reflect on all that we have to be thankful for and remember those who need our help. This year’s brunch made me think again about why I give to CSU because I was the featured speaker.

I was a first-generation college student who would not be here now without the encouragement of my parents and the generosity of scholarship donors. Dean Gill introduced me by saying that I would speak about a new chapter in my story as an educator.

Here’s the story I told.

My new chapter opens with a bequest that my husband and I recently decided to make to the English department. But the story behind it is a story of the encouragement of parents who wanted for their children the education they could not have and the generous support of scholarship donors.

When I was two years old, my parents bought the first of many Series E US Savings Bonds and started a college savings account at the bank.

When I was four years old, they bought a set of the American Peoples encyclopedias that my mother had in her home until she moved to assisted living at age 84.

Before I started school, my parents found an old wooden school desk with a flip top lid so that I could play school with my younger siblings and dolls. At least the dolls were cooperative.

Neither of my parents had gone beyond high school and our family of five lived on what my father earned as an auto mechanic, but college was never a question. Paying for it was.

I chose a liberal arts college not only for the education but because the combination of scholarships and financial aid made it possible for me to go. When my parents dropped me off at school, I knew they were proud. Later my mother confided that my father cried as they drove away.

A few months later, my father died suddenly, and I didn’t know if we could afford for me to stay in school. Financial aid, work-study grants, and the generosity of scholarship donors made it possible for me to stay.

After college I went on to teach junior and senior high school for 19 years and earned 2 more degrees. When I successfully defended my dissertation, my mother sent flowers to Dr. Reid. She never tired of telling the story of correcting the florist when the florist asked for his address. “Dr. Reid is my daughter,” she said.

When I took the position at CSU, she turned to the encyclopedias they had bought so long ago to learn about where I would be teaching, but if you think a minute about the age of those encyclopedias, you’ll know what she found instead. She called and said “Did you mean you are going to Colorado A&M?”

Education mattered to my parents and it matters to us. Dave and I have always believed in giving to what matters, and we believe in the future of CSU. We want to ensure opportunities for generations of students to get an education that matters to them and to society.

I am thankful for the generosity that made my education possible.