Daily Archives: April 30, 2014

Call for Alumni News

The English Department has many great alumni. For example, CSU alumnus George Kalamaras was recently selected Poet Laureate of Indiana, alumna Chloe’ Leisure is the Poet Laureate of Fort Collins, alumnus Justin Hocking’s memoir The Great Floodgates of the Wonderworld was released February 11th, and alumna Mackenzie Fogelson is the founder and CEO of a successful company, Mack Web Solutions – just to name a few.

When stories about our alumni hit the news or we are emailed an update, we love to share it. Teachers, staff, and fellow alumni are happy to hear how their friends are doing. Current students appreciate examples of previous students making a life, making a difference. Prospective students are encouraged knowing what our program has to offer and where it takes people.

We are hoping to feature more news of CSU English Department alumni making their way in the world. If you are a CSU English Department Alumni, please email Jill.Salahub@Colostate.edu and let her help you share your story.

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Speaker Series (Literacies of Contemporary Civic Life): Linda Christensen

Linda Christensen was the sixth and final presenter in the department’s speaker series, “Literacies of Contemporary Civic Life.” Christensen is an Instructor and Director of the Oregon Writing Project at the Lewis & Clark Graduate School of Education, and a Counseling & Rethinking Schools Editorial Board member. Her presentation as part of the series was titled, “The Tulsa Race Riot: Raising Voices Silenced by History” and described this way,

The past is not dead, and it needs to be remembered for students to understand contemporary patterns of wealth and poverty, privilege and marginalization. Our curriculum should equip students to “talk back” to the world. Students must learn to pose essential critical questions: Who makes decisions and who is left out? Who benefits and who suffers? What are the origins of today’s problems? What alternatives can we imagine? What is required to create change? In this presentation, Christensen will engage participants in an examination of a historical event from eyewitness accounts to revisit the history of the 1921 Tulsa Race Riot. Through this workshop, she will demonstrate how she uses “silences” in history to construct solid literacy practices including persuasive essays and historical fiction, building a framework for critical literacy that helps students navigate an increasingly unequal world.

Here’s a video of Linda Christensen’s presentation.

Linda Christensen and Antero Garcia

Linda Christensen and Antero Garcia

English Department Communications Intern Brianna Wilkins attended the presentation, and has this to share:

After a few weeks’ hiatus, April 22 was the finale of the spring 2014 Speaker Series. Since it’s nearing the end of the semester, crowds usually tend to thin and would rather spend a nice evening outdoors, so it was a lovely surprise to see that so many people came out to support what was the last of a phenomenal series of presentations. Everyone in attendance was graced by the presence of Linda Christensen, the Director of the Oregon Writing Project, located in the Graduate School of Education at Lewis & Clark College.

She spoke about the Tulsa Race Riot of May 31 and June 1, 1921 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Due to the fact the majority of the audience had never heard of this riot before, the conversation and group activity that took place was one of curiosity and emotion. Christensen’s presentation brought everyone in the room closer together, as we worked together to figure out what really happened during those two days of the riot.

Everyone in the room was given a sheet of paper with a short story about a witness’s involvement in the riot. We were then asked to get up and mingle with people in the room, to work together to find out the cause and effect of the riot. After we received various stories and clues from the people involved we came back together as a group to discuss what all happened during those unfortunate couple of days in Tulsa. Thousands of blacks were left homeless, and justice was never served to those who were affected by the horrors of the riot.

The clue I was given read was about a character named Maria Morales Gutierrez, a Mexican woman who heard the ruckus on the street. After going outside she noticed two black children running loose in the streets without their parents. She rescued them, but a group of white people demanded she hand them over. She refused to do so, but was terrified for her life because so many blacks were being ruthlessly murdered. We discussed that things like this in America’s history are often overlooked and ignored. It’s sad that many of us had no clue that this ever happened, but it was a pleasure for the group as a whole to be engaged and sharing their thoughts about this horrific event.

Christensen explained that she does this activity with many students, and that it engages them to speak and what to learn more about what happened during this piece of forgotten history. This was an eye opening presentation, and it shed light on a part of American history that was denied for 75 years.

I am grateful for being given the opportunity to attend all of the speaker series that were offered. Although the majority of the topics were geared towards English Education majors, it was informative for everyone who attended. Professor Antero Garcia was always full of excitement, and there were always cupcakes and fruit available for us to snack on if we were lacking in energy from a long day. If you missed out on any of these series there are videos that you can view, available in each blog post about the series. If you do decide to tune in, I hope you enjoy them as much we did!

For more information about the Tulsa Race Riot of 1921, please visit tulsareparations.org/TRR.htm

~Brianna Wilkins

Humans of Eddy: Davia Carr

davia
Does Davia look familiar to you? You might recognize her because she’s a work study in the English Department’s main office.


What is your major, and when will you graduate?

I major in Human Development and Family Studies (HDSF), and I’ll graduate in December of 2014.

What is required of your position as a work study?

There’s always so much to do; I help everyone in here. I especially work a lot with Sheila. Right now we’re working on certificates; I’m working on the finished product which is printing them, framing them, and then organizing them. I also do a lot of copying and filing documents, but I like organizing. I pretty much help everyone out so that their jobs aren’t as hectic, because they do a lot of stuff. This semester I usually work 14 hours a week, but last semester I worked 17; I can just work my hours around my school schedule.

What has been your favorite moment at CSU?

The CU vs CSU football game my freshman year was one of my most memorable. I didn’t really know anyone there, but I went with two of my really good friends; we had so much fun. Also Ram Welcome was pretty fun. I met my roommates friend that she met during orientation, and we’ve all been best friends ever since. That was a good experience because it brought us closer, and we met a lot of people. That’s why I’m applying to be a Ram Welcome leader, because it made me like CSU more, and I would like to help at least one new person feel welcome here as well.

Describe Eddy in one word.

Antique/Nostalgic

Do you have a favorite song?

My favorite song right now would have to be “Let it Go” from the movie Frozen; I hear it all of the time. I think that it’s one of my favorite because she’s finally breaking out of her shell, and no longer hiding. I feel like a lot of people sometimes hide who they are, and when they finally figure out who they are and become comfortable with themselves, they are happier.

Do you have any advice for incoming freshmen?

Meet new people and try new things. Don’t be one of those people who chooses to stay in their dorms; get out there and have fun!

Are you working towards any goals?

Ever since I was young I wanted to work with kids, and now I’m doing everything that I can to lead me in that direction. I have this internship working with kids, and all of my classes are helping me too. Working with children and helping them in any way possible is my ultimate goal.